Earthquakes list October 20, 2010

M 5.8      2010/10/21 02:49    Depth 6.7 km     OFF COAST OF LIBERTADOR O’HIGGINS, CHILE
October 20, 2010 at 09:49:56 PM at epicenter
Strong seaquake-aftershock
Please also read the detailed page of this earthquake

M 4.1      2010/10/20 22:05    Depth 6.1 km     BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO
03:05 PM (15:05) at epicenter
Epicenter 75 km (45 miles) SE of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico

M 4.6      2010/10/20 21:32    Depth 97 km     SAN JUAN, ARGENTINA
local time 18:32 at epicenter
Epicenter in the Salar area near the border with Chile

M 4.3      2010/10/20 19:59     Depth 1 km     TAJIKISTAN
October 21 local time 00:59 at epicenter
Weak shallow earthquake

M 4.6      2010/10/20 16:05     Depth 38.4 km     NEAR THE COAST OF ECUADOR
11:05 AM at epicenter
Moderate earthquake (aftershock) on top of the same subduction area than many other earthquakes from the recent days

M 5.2      2010/10/20 14:35    Depth 4.1 km     TONGA
October 21, 2010 at 03:35:53 AM at epicenter
As so many other earthquakes the last few days, this quake has also it’s epicenter on the slopes of the subduction zone near the island of Pangai. Not powerful enough to cause problems.

M 5.1      2010/10/20 07:12    Depth 70.5 km     SAMAR, PHILIPPINES
03:12 PM (15:12) at epicenter
Epicenter about 30 km out in in the Philippine Sea. Very populated coastal area. Main cities in the area are Pambujan (pop 10,812) and Legazpi (pop 143,301). Depth will ease the impact of the shaking.

M 5.8      2010/10/20 06:58    Depth 23.7 km     GULF OF CALIFORNIA
12:58 AM (00:58) at epicenter
Aftershock which has a preliminary value higher than the strongst quake so far. It occurred just after midnight confirming Earthquake-report.com fear for many powerful aftershocks. Although not damaging at this Magnitude, the shocks are strong enough to scare people, especially if they happen within a couple of hours from each other.
The M 5.8 value is preliminary and published here minutes after the event took place. It can be updated soon.

M 4.7      2010/10/20 04:30    Depth 10.0 km     GULF OF CALIFORNIA
October 19, 2010 at 10:30:38 PM at epicenter
Aftershock

M 5.5      2010/10/20 04:15    Depth 10.0 km     GULF OF CALIFORNIA
October 19, 2010 at 10:15:37 PM at epicenter
Aftershock

M 5.7      2010/10/20 04:09    Depth 14.4 km     GULF OF CALIFORNIA
October 19, 2010 at 10:09:44 PM at epicenter
Powerful shallow seaquake on the fault line in the middle of the Gulf of California. The earthquake must have been felt in a wide area but only light to moderate shaking is expected by the experts.
Read also
Please also read the detailed page of this earthquake

M 4.9      2010/10/20 03:53    Depth 61.4 km     TONGA
04:53 PM (16:53) at epicenter
Closest to the islands of Neiafu and Pangai since the many last earthquakes. Combination depth / Magnitude seem harmless to us

M 4.7      2010/10/20 03:39    Depth 8.1 km     GULF OF CALIFORNIA
October 19, 2010 at 09:39 PM (21:39) at epicenter
Seaquake right in the middle of the Gulf of California on the fault line and 105 km (65 miles) SW of Guamuchil, Sinaloa, Mexico

M 4.8      2010/10/20 01:05    Depth 38.2 km     NEAR THE COAST OF ECUADOR
October 19, 2010 at 08:05 PM (20:05) at epicenter
Epicenter 55 km (35 miles) N of Manta, Ecuador

Earthquakes occurred on October 19 UTC, but on October 20 local time

M 5.1      2010/10/19 21:16    Depth 44.5 km     TONGA
October 20, 2010 at 10:16:24 AM at epicenter
Aftershock on nearly the same location than the M 5.5 earthquake from earlier today.

M 5.0      2010/10/19 20:49    Depth 41.8 km     SUNDA STRAIT, INDONESIA
October 20, 2010 at 03:49 AM at epicenter
Epicenter right in the middle of the Sunda Strait, the sea street in between Sumatra and Java.

M 5.5      2010/10/19 20:39    Depth 21.1 km     TONGA
October 20, 2010 at 09:39 AM at epicenter
Powerful earthquake on the same location than earlier today, right on the steep slope of the subduction area. NO tsunami bulletins have been published

M 4.8      2010/10/19 18:48    Depth 23.9 km     NEAR THE SOUTH COAST OF PAPUA, INDONESIA
October 20, 2010 at 03:48 AM at epicenter
Epicenter 120 km (75 miles) NW of Dobo, Kepulauan Aru, Irian Jaya Indonesia

seismograph - recordingUseful information to read this daily earthquake list
This earthquake list covers minor and major earthquakes in the world.
If a more detailed page is present, the earthquake line will be linked to the detailed page.
For your comfort, we will provide in most cases Google Satellite Map links to give you an idea where the earthquake struck, which terrain it happened and if villages or cities are located in the immediate vicinity. The reference for the time zone is UTC (Coordinated Universal Time, also called GMT)
The page is regularly updated to add new earthquakes.
green color = NOT dangerous for damage or injuries
orange color = MODERATE risk for damage or injuries
red color = CONSIDERABLE risk for damage or injuries

QuakeSOS has been developed to help actively people who are caught in an earthquake + delivers "Earthquake Report" information on your iPhoneQuakeSOS is a FREE iPhone application developed by Armand Vervaeck, the creator and main contributor to Earthquake Report. The Application simplifies immediate group communication to friends and family members (with your exact GPS location) and is constantly feeding the users with “Earthquake Report” news. Together with your own family and friends, QuakeSOS will be your closest earthquake friend.

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How to easily strengthen Haiti earthquake-prone structures ?

Civil engineers studying the effects of Haiti’s devastating earthquake have concluded that a relatively simple system could be used by officials to quickly decide how to modify existing buildings and construct new ones that would better withstand future quakes.

The system, which uses a priority index to rank reinforced concrete buildings according to their seismic vulnerability, originally was developed in Japan and later adapted for use in Turkey by researchers at Purdue University.

A recent study has shown that the system also is applicable to Haiti. The indexing system could be used to identify which buildings need to be strengthened and to guide the construction of new structures, said Santiago Pujol, a Purdue assistant professor of civil engineering.

The researchers surveyed 170 buildings damaged in the January 2010 earthquake. About 40 percent of the buildings were heavily damaged, and findings showed that about 90 percent of those damaged structures would have been classified as vulnerable if the system had been in use.

“What the index tells you is that for a given-size building, the smaller the columns and the fewer the walls between the columns, the more likely the building is to have severe damage,” Irfanoglu said. “Its strength is in its simplicity and the ease of measuring it in the field.”

The index is a ratio of the combined cross sectional areas of all of the ground-story columns and walls compared to a building’s total usable floor area.

A common flaw seen in the buildings is referred to as “captive columns,” where a wall is attached to a column but does not extend as high as the column, leaving a portion of the column unsupported. This configuration, often seen in school buildings, results in severe damage to the unsupported segment of the columns.

The flaw is widespread in Haiti, as well as China, Latin America, Turkey and many other countries, but buildings could easily be strengthened by reconfiguring the “partial-height” walls, Pujol said.

“The Haitians need to concentrate on fixing the buildings that have smaller columns and fewer walls, and there are many such buildings still standing,” he said. “Secondly, they should modify the buildings that have captive columns and ban the use of captive columns in new buildings.”

About 60 percent of the 170 buildings had captive columns.

“We are sharing these findings with engineers at Haiti’s Ministry of Public Works, and we hope they will be interested in using it,” Irfanoglu said.

Click here to read the full original article from Perdue University

Article Courtesy : Perdue University

Christchurch Earthquake Damage Map with ‘damage and testimonies’

Earthquake-Report.com is always in for “added value” articles from local publishers.
We came across a fantastic initiative from “The Press – Stuff.co.nzwho had the idea of bundling testimonies from people living in the earthquake area on a google map. With colored buttons viewers can click on each of the buttons and read the story behind the button.

Most damage seem to have occurred in the old city center of Christchurch, although other parts of the area were also hurt.

If you click on the map, you are linked to the big interactive earthquake map from the publisher.
Congratulations from Earthquake-Report.com for this great initiative.

How is earthquake data measured, computed and published ?

Geonet, The New Zealand governmental office who publishes earthquake information, released a very good describing article how an earthquake is measured, monitored, computed etc.
Earthquake-Report.com has a constant interest in explaining the background of earthquake numbers for his readers. We hope that this article will clarify a number of issues concerning earthquakes.

To make rapid locations of earthquakes GeoNet operates a country-wide network of seismic stations that transmit their data to the GeoNet Data Management Centre (DMC) where it is analysed by automated processes. If the automated processes detect an earthquake the Duty Response Team is notified and if the Duty Officer confirms that the earthquake is real and significant, the earthquake information is released.

The seismic stations operated by GeoNet consist of a seismometer and a seismograph. A seismometer is a sensitive instrument that generates a small electrical current in response to ground shaking. The electrical current is digitised by the seismograph and transmitted continuously to the DMC in real time. This digital recording of ground shaking is the raw data used to make earthquake locations. The seismic stations are supplemented by a network of strong-motion seismographs, which only transmit data whenever they detect a higher level of shaking, typically from earthquakes that will have been felt by the public.

The real-time seismic data is received by the DMC data reception computers located at Avalon (Lower Hutt) and Wairakei (near Taupo) and analysed automatically for possible earthquakes. The computer processes look for ground shaking that is distinct from the normal background activity (such as that caused by weather and oceans) and may be associated with an earthquake. These occurrences are called detections. If a detection is deemed significant, then the relevant portion of the data is parcelled up and sent to the DMC data analysis computers. They store all the detected earthquake data, grouping the detections from different stations into earthquake data sets. The detections are examined for P (primary) and S (secondary) wave arrivals from the earthquake, and the times of these arrivals are inverted against seismic velocity models for the earth to yield the best location for the event. The magnitude of the earthquake is determined at a station by measuring the maximum amplitude of the seismic signals, and relating them to the distance of the station from the event, together with the characteristics of the seismometer and seismograph. The magnitudes from all available stations are then averaged to give an overall value for the event.

It also provides locally recorded data from global earthquakes to the International Seismological Centre in the United Kingdom, and preliminary earthquake information to the National Earthquake Information Center, part of the United States Geological Survey responsible for locating major earthquakes worldwide. The waveform data and the located hypocentres are freely available to the worldwide community of researchers through the Resources section of this website.

Courtesy Geonet and GNS Science – Link to the original article of Geonet – GNS Science

Powerful seaquake with aftershocks in the Gulf of California

Mexico, Baja California, Gulf of California (N...

Gulf of California - Image by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center via Flickr

Earthquake Report comment :
Powerful shallow seaquake right on the fault line in the middle of the Gulf of California. The earthquake must have been felt in a wide area but only light to moderate shaking is expected by the experts.
In terms of Modified Mercalli scale,  a maximum of IV is expected in the coastal towns. IV Mercalli will have been felt by more than 1 million people. IV Mercalli means light shaking.
The earthquake’s epicenter is located right on the fault line, luckily in the middle of the Gulf of California.
One preshock of M 4.7 and 2 aftershocks of M 5.5 and M 4.7 have occurred in the same area. There may be more shocks to come and the people in the area will have a difficult sleep tonight.
NO tsunami bulletins have been published by NOAA

Most important Earthquake Data:
Magnitude : Mw 5.7
Tuesday, October 19, 2010 at 10:09:44 PM at epicenter
Depth (Hypocenter) : 14,4 km
Geo-location(s) :
130 km (80 miles) S of Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Mexico
130 km (80 miles) SW of Guamuchil, Sinaloa, Mexico
135 km (85 miles) ENE of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Links to important maps
USGS Did You Feel It Map
Google satellite map of the area showing the kind of terrain the earthquake took place
USGS Shaking map
USGS historic earthquakes map
Fault line map
Nearest Live Seismogram (Albuquerque, New Mexico)

QuakeSOS has been developed to help actively people who are caught in an earthquake + delivers "Earthquake Report" information on your iPhoneQuakeSOS is a FREE iPhone application developed by Armand Vervaeck, the creator and main contributor to Earthquake Report. The Application simplifies immediate group communication to friends and family members (with your exact GPS location) and is constantly feeding the users with “Earthquake Report” news. Together with your own family and friends, QuakeSOS will be your closest earthquake friend.

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